TV viewing losing ground

February 20, 2008

If you have an Internet connection, chances are you are spending much more time surfing the Web than watching TV. “The time spent using the Internet will continue to increase at the expense of television and, to a lesser extent, print media,” said Karsten Weide, program director, Digital Media and Entertainment at IDC. “This suggests that advertising budgets will continue to be shifted out of television, newspapers, and magazines into Internet advertising.”

Read at www.unitedBIT.com


How to Create a Successful Facebook Widget

February 15, 2008

When Facebook opened its platform to third-party developers in late May, mom-and-pop shop widget makers from California to Turkey cropped up everywhere to capitalize on Facebook’s fast-growing user base of 52 million people. Initially, it was easy to dismiss this widget economy as a microcosm for another Web bubble. But in reality, analysts say widget makers are not only creating innovative, user-friendly products, they’re also making a bunch of money—real money—from ads

Read at www.unitedBIT.com


Nielsen: How People Use Web Video

February 15, 2008

In its first significant study of how people consume online video, Nielsen Online has found that women tend to favor network television on the Web, while men are drawn to user-created content.

Women are nearly twice as likely as men to tune into videos on TV networks’ Web sites, according to Nielsen Online’s first public release of its research into online-video viewing habits.

Reat at www.unitedBIT.com


Tech Stocks for Tough Times

February 15, 2008

WHETHER IT’S a slowdown or full-blown recession, most people agree we’re heading into choppy economic waters. The question, then, is which sectors and which companies are best positioned to withstand the tempest? One answer is technology, especially companies that help their customers stretch a buck–including firms that run a software-as-a-service model and ones that are pushing the limits of computer-virtualization technologies.

Companies in these categories offer customers the ability to do more with less, whether it’s money, people, or both. And there is good reason to take a look at these tech companies no matter what the prevailing economic winds, because they are riding trends that will barrel ahead in good times and bad.

Read at www.unitedBIT.com


Forbes: Eight Trends For A Mobile World

February 14, 2008

A 10-year veteran of Nokia, Lindholm has done stints with its famed user interface group. He also directed Yahoo!’s mobile group from 2005 to 2007. These days, Lindholm heads London-based design consultancy Fjord.

Lindholm recently spoke with Forbes.com about the eight mobile trends he’s identified for 2008.

Read more at unitedBIT.com


The Road to Success is Long for the Mobile Internet

November 21, 2007

by Carl Weinschenk,

The mobile Internet is in trouble. It’s hard to escape that conclusion when a well known analyst — Yankee Group president and CEO Emily Green — says that it “pretty much sucks.”

Actually, the prime topic of this InternetNews story from the first Mobile Internet World conference last week in Boston was a speech by Tim Berners-Lee. Lee is the director of the World Wide Web Consortium and is called the father of the Web so often that it seems like part of his official title. Lee expanded on Green’s eloquence by saying that people are reluctant to move from proprietary formats and protocols to explore new vistas. He said, according to the story, that new standards, “contextual” content, location-based platforms and “user awareness” — which probably refers to presence — will improve the mobile Internet.

Green’s eloquence also is expanded upon in a Yankee Group study, “Mobile Internet Utopia: Imagine if Supply Could Satisfy Demand,” that was released at the conference. The release on the study said that the mobile Internet “should already be” worth $66 billion per year, but has only reached $9.5 billion. Indeed, the firm says that even the $66 billion figure is conservative because it only refers to access revenues.

Whether the mobile Internet closes that gap or not is by no means certain. Clearly, there are many attractive applications and platforms available. A post at BizznTech, for instance, describes five: Gmail Java applications for mobile phones;Google Maps for Mobile; Opera Mini; Fring and ShoZu. During his remarks, Berners-Lee demonstrated a GPS-enabled watch that also monitors heart rates.

A commentary at TelecomTV looks optimistically at recent announcements in the mobile Internet arena. The biggest news, he says, isAndroid from Google. The piece outlines what the company is doing, but says that a couple of issues — changes in the landscape likely before it is ready and the questions about the strength of Linux-based system — could limit its impact.

Our sense is that we are at a crossroads. There is no doubt that the Mobile Internet will generate a lot of money — indeed, even the paltry $9.5 billion noted by Yankee is a lot. The InternetNews piece refers to “the long tail,” the idea that applications from many little providers will add up to great bundles of revenue. One question is whether this model will work — we worry about technologists’ mastery of economic theory — or whether a “killer app” is needed. The more basic question, however, is if these and other applications will appeal to non-geeks.

Source:IT Business Edge


Is the Web 2.0 Bubble Set to Burst?

November 20, 2007

By Jim Rapoza

In recent months, an increasing number of technology analysts and pundits have started to sound the alarm that we are on the cusp of another technology bubble burst—in this case, the Web 2.0 bubble. If you expect me to disagree with these pundits, guess again. Of course another bubble burst is coming.

All of this talk about bubbles got me thinking about the classic cycles of busts. Because when you analyze past technology bubbles, you’ll always see the same progression from pure technology to pure marketing. By paying attention to this progression, you might even be able to tell when a bubble is getting too big for its own good and is likely to burst.

So how does one begin to build a technology bubble? At the beginning of a bubble, it’s all technology. This is the point of entry of the inventers. These are the people who have the idea of a new groundbreaking technology, such as e-commerce, social networking, PC software, whatever. At this end of the spectrum, the participants are brilliant technologically but have no marketing skills whatsoever. The only people who are paying attention to their breakthroughs are those with similar technological inclinations.

The next phase is where the innovative entrepreneurs come in. These players understand the technology but also have enough marketing skills and salesmanship to build products that people actually want, and they are able to start real buzz around a new technology.

This leads to the equilibrium point for technology and marketing. This is also the stage in a technology bubble where the biggest, best and most enduring solutions are created—whether it’s Microsoft, Amazon, Google or eBay.

Unfortunately, this is also the stage in which the people who are all marketing and no technology decide that it’s time to get in on the action. You know who these “entrepreneurs” are. These are the snake oil salesmen. The people who talk a good game and can convince anyone from venture capitalists to the press to the general public that they have the biggest, coolest, most important new thing out there.

So what if their product doesn’t do anything, or has no way to actually make money, or is a bad version of another product that’s already out there? These players are so good at marketing themselves and their products that they are able to generate irrational exuberance.

But all these people are really supplying is a bunch of hot air. And you know what happens to bubbles when they get too full of hot air.

Pop.

And so the bubble bursts, taking down the shameful hucksters who caused the burst (though also typically taking down a few legitimate companies that deserved better).

But the bubble burst isn’t always a bad thing. For the technologies involved, it can be a cleansing experience. With all the hype and hot air removed, the technology can settle down to doing its intended job. After all, despite the damage of the .com bust, e-commerce is doing just fine.

So keep an eye on your bubble cycles and know when to avoid the hot air. And, remember: Somewhere out there right now is a technology-savvy and marketing-weak inventor who is starting the first puffs for a whole new technology bubble.

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